Posted in BEGINNERS, General, Songs

Saint Valentine’s Day



Well, tomorrow is a special day for lovers. Let’s share our favourite love songs! This is mine:

Your song (written by Elton John, but this is a brilliant version by Ewan McGegor in Moulin Rouge, a great film):

Well, I think I can’t choose one, so let me show you some of them:
Rod Steward: Have I Told You Lately (this song was written by Van Morrison, but I love this version)

Great singer, great song: You Are So Beautiful, Joe Cocker.

Mr Slowhand plays Wonderful Tonight:

Of course, a great ballad by Scorpions: Still Loving You:

The Police: Every Breath You Take

Queen: Somebody to Love (great concert, God Bless Him)

Van Morrison: Someone Like You.

John Lennon: Jealous Guy

The Beatles: Something

Charles Aznavour: She (Elvis Costello’s version is wonderful too)

Metallica: Nothing Else Matters

Aerosmith: I Don’t Wanna Miss a Thing.

Phil Collins: Take A Look At Me Now

Dire Straits: Romeo and Juliet

Camel: Long Goodbyes

Frankie Goes to Holliwood: The Power of Love

Sinead O’Connor: Nothing Compares to You

U2: With or Without You

And last but not least: The Boss playing an original song by the king Elvis


Remember, you must tell me why you like it! See you tomorrow.

Posted in BEGINNERS, Grammar

Comparison in English


EXPLANATION
Positive Form

Use the positive form of the adjective if the comparison contains one of the following expressions:

as … as

Example: Jane is as tall as John.

not as … as / not so … as

Example: John is not as tall as Arnie.

Comparative Form and Superlative Form (-er/-est)

one-syllable adjectives (clean, new, cheap)
two-syllable adjectives ending in -y or -er (easy, happy, pretty, dirty, clever)

positive form comparative form superlative form
clean cleaner (the) cleanest
Exceptions in spelling when adding -er / -est

silent ‘e’ is dropped

Example: late-later-latest
final ‘y’ after a consonant becomes i

Example: easy-easier-easiest
final consonant after short, stressed vowel is doubled

Example: hot-hotter-hottest

Comparative Form and Superlative Form (more/most)

adjectives of three or more syllables (and two-syllable adjectives not ending in -y/-er)

positive form comparative form superlative form
difficult more difficult most difficult

Comparative Form and Superlative Form (irregular comparisons)
positive form comparative form superlative form
good better best
bad / ill worse worst
little (amount) less least
little (size) smaller smallest
much / many more most
far (place + time) further furthest
far (place) farther farthest
late (time) later latest
late (order) latter last
near (place) nearer nearest
old older oldest
old (family) elder eldest
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ACTIVITIES
1. Comparatives (long and short), by Cynthia Wilkinson
Find this and other comparatives/superlatives exercises in English Exercises .org

2. A game: http://www.marks-english-school.com/games/basketball.html

3. Comparison of adverbs and adjectives, by lcio
Find this and other comparatives/superlatives exercises in English Exercises .org

4. VERY GOOD!! (EXPLANATION VIDEOS INCLUDED) Comparison of Adjectives, by Victoria-Ladybug
Find this and other comparatives/superlatives exercises in English Exercises .org